News

Report points to healthy future for state waterways

by
January 11, 2018

Minister for Water Lisa Neville released the 2016-17 Victorian Catchment Management Authorities Actions and Achievements Report, highlighting the work completed by Victoria’s 10 CMAs.

VICTORIA’S catchment management authorities (CMAs) had a successful 2017.

The authorities have been delivering healthier waterways and catchments, jobs and more liveable communities right across the state.

Minister for Water Lisa Neville released the 2016-17 Victorian Catchment Management Authorities Actions and Achievements Report, highlighting the work completed by Victoria’s 10 CMAs.

“This report clearly shows the contribution that our catchment management authorities are having across Victorian communities – delivering healthier rivers and landscapes that we can all enjoy into the future,” Ms Neville said.

“I want to congratulate the authorities for their work and look forward to continuing to deliver healthier catchments for all Victorians.”

The highlights of the report include:

■985 square kilometres of native vegetation works

■93,545 community and landholders working to improve the environment, including 1476 square metres of agricultural land

■99 square kilometres of weeds controlled and 5238 square kilometres of pest control completed

■549 waterway structures to stabilise banks and improve habitat

■991 kilometres of fences built or improved

■7039 requests for permits, licences, leases and planning referrals provided to landholders

■375,000 hours of work completed to support Landcare groups and protect land, water and biodiversity valued at $11.2 million

This work includes large-scale projects to improve the health of 36 priority waterways and the delivery of water for the environment to rivers, wetlands and estuaries with the Victorian Environmental Water Holder (VEWH) and local communities.

In many cases, the timing and levels of these environmental water releases have been delivered to maximise recreation opportunities such as fishing and better reflect Aboriginal cultural values.

The CMAs have continued to support drought-affected farmers through the state government’s drought recovery package with funding to establish drought employment crews.

They have also continued to build stronger relationships with Aboriginal Victorians, including identifying Aboriginal values and uses of water to help build the capacity of the sector to ensure the involvement of traditional owners.

To view the report head to, ppwcma.vic.gov.au/actionsandachievements.

By
More in Regional
Login Sign Up

Dummy text